STC Toronto Event: A New Approach to Resume Writing to Beat HR Robots Tuesday, April 11, 2017

FREE for current Tech Comm students. RSVP to Vic Bhai.

Shared from STC Toronto:

Pamela Paterson

Pamela Paterson

Do you know how to beat the HR robot and get your resume noticed by a human being? If  you apply for jobs online, you need to know how to beat Applicant Tracking Systems (ATSs) with an online resume and effective personal branding.  In this highly informative seminar with bestselling author Pamela Paterson, you will learn how to get your resume in top shape so that it stands out amongst the crowd.

Many qualified candidates go unnoticed by HR because they have not learned how to get filtered and top-ranked in HR systems. In fact, HR may never know they applied, because their resume is either deleted automatically by the system or ranked so low in the candidate pile it doesn’t appear in an HR search.

It is no longer enough that you have the right qualifications based on an impressive work history. In the online job hunt, to get noticed by HR, you need to understand how ATSs work. In this seminar, you will be shown the top ways in which these systems filter and rank candidates, and what you can do to beat the system.

Join us on the second floor of The Wallace Gastropub (steps away from Davisville Station).
WHEN:  April 11, 2017,  6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

In this seminar, you will learn how to:

  • Deconstruct a job posting for the important elements needed to beat HR robots

  • Separate the critical words from the “fluff” in job postings and company collateral

  • Identify issues with your resume that are barriers to getting top-ranked

  • Position your skills and qualifications to best present your candidacy

  • Incorporate personal branding in your resume to best position your skills

Speaker Bio

Pamela Paterson is author of the bestselling book Get the Job: Optimize Your Resume for the Online Job Search, gained an insider’s edge into how online job systems work when she was part of a team that implemented an applicant tracking system for a national company. She has taught about the art and science of creating effective resumes for over 15 years at workshops, colleges, and conferences.

Pamela is a long-time mentor, resume coach, college instructor, and supporter of people who strive for positive change in their lives. She serves on the Board of Directors for the SIPO Foundation, a charity dedicated to empowering youth personally and professionally. Pamela also leads resume and career workshops for the SIPO Foundation.

Pamela works to help individuals boost their career trajectory and reach their full professional potential.  In live presentations and in her book, she lays out a strategic, step-by-step approach to beating online job systems and building laser-sharp resumes that hits home with online hiring professionals. She claims a 90% success rate in helping her clients find jobs through her unique, scientific approach to resume writing.

“After meeting with Pamela and revising my resume, I immediately posted the new version… and literally within 3 hours I received two calls from recruiters about appropriate opportunities. The next day was spent fielding responses from more than 12 recruiters for more than 15 positions—all of which were relevant to my skill set! Within 2 weeks I had interviews, and within 3 weeks was offered a position that was perfect for me. I received unsolicited comments from both interviewers and recruiters as to the professionalism of my newly revised resume, and how impressive it was. I credit Pamela for her insight into what works, what doesn’t, and what is needed to create a winning and effective resume.”

—Patti Cruickshank, Technical Writer 

FREE for currently-enrolled Tech Comm students (proof of enrollment must be shown). TechComm students should contact STC Toronto president, Vic Bhai, to RSVP.

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Seneca Becomes CPTC Accredited Training Organization

Seneca College has been approved as the first Accredited Training Organization for Certified Professional Technical Communicators (CPTC). We can now offer Foundation level training and the certification exam to students and working professionals.

For more information on Certification, and upcoming training sessions, contact Beth Agnew.

 

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Seneca Tech Comm Professors Honored

Two of our Seneca Tech Comm professors have received professional acknowledgement from the Society for Technical Communication (STC). Beth Agnew has been named an Associate Fellow, and Bernard Aschwanden has been elected Vice President of the Society; he will move into the role of STC President next year.

These honors represent endorsement by their peers of their skills and leadership in the profession of technical communication, a discipline where practitioners make technology easier to use and understand.

“We are delighted to see our faculty achieve these important professional milestones,” said Michael Maynard, Dean of the Faculty of Communication, Art and Design. “Both professors are generous in sharing their deep industry expertise with our students, and have further distinguished themselves by their commitment to our post-graduate Technical Communication program. Our graduates enter the field with confidence in their skills, having been mentored by such accomplished teachers.”

Advancement to the rank of Associate Fellow is predicated upon having accomplished important work in the field of technical communication, made significant contributions to the Society, held leadership positions, published papers, given presentations, and mentored those new to the field.

Beth Agnew, one of the first to achieve the Certified Professional Technical Communicator designation, has been the manager of the STC’s Marketing Communications Special Interest Group (SIG), assisted with the STC’s Military Transition to Tech Comm initiative, and is a popular speaker at society events and industry conferences. She is the coordinator of the Seneca Technical Communication program.

The position of STC Vice President involves promoting the profession worldwide, and guiding the future direction of the Society. The VP moves into the role of President, then serves as immediate Past-President, making it a 3-year commitment for the person elected.

Bernard Aschwanden is a certified Adobe expert and trainer, and specializes in single-sourced content, which he teaches in the Tech Comm program. He is an Associate Fellow, has been president of the Toronto Chapter of the STC, and served recently as a Director of the society.

Both professors will be acknowledged at an honors banquet at the STC International Summit in Phoenix, AZ in May.

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New Program Co-ordinator

After four years as co-ordinator of the Technical Communication program, Beth Agnew is handing over this responsibility to Anna Parker-Richards.

“It’s a great opportunity to get someone new involved in the Program,” says Professor Agnew. “Anna has been a strong leader in the Toronto chapter of the STC and her drive will be an asset to Seneca College and to our technical communication students.”

Having grown the program from a low of 18 students when she took over as co-ordinator in 2008 to a recent high of 42 students, Professor Agnew is still going to be active in getting the word out about this top post-graduate educational program for those seeking to enter the profession.

“I’ll still be teaching technical communication subjects and working with Anna and our co-op co-ordinator Charmaine Johnson to find appropriate work placements for our students,” says Agnew. Due to the program’s excellent reputation, there are more applicants than ever — prompting a second intake that will begin in May 2013.

Agnew thinks the program provides great return on investment. “The technical communication program is ideal for career changers because they can leverage their existing skills, background and experience into a new profession. Nothing is wasted. For new university graduates, the Tech Comm program offers a way to add to their skills while the students are still in “study mode”. It helps them differentiate themselves from all the others graduating with similar degrees.”

Tech Comm grads have proven technology and communication skills — high value currency in today’s workplace. “Plus, they’re trained to be problem-solvers,” says Agnew. “Providing solutions to customer problems always improves a company’s bottom line. That makes us very valuable commodities in any company.”

Agnew is excited about the new directions the Tech Comm program will be taking with Anna Parker-Richards as co-ordinator. “Anna is a positive leader,” she says. “She’s a master at networking and has the vision to ensure our program is meeting the needs of employers and students.”

For more information on the Technical Communication program, and to apply, see http://senecacollege.ca/fulltime/TECC.html

 

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First Certified Professional Technical Communicator

Professor Beth Agnew, Seneca College, has become one of the first in the world to receive the new Certified Professional Technical Communicator (CPTC)™ designation from the Society for Technical Communication.

“It’s a great step forward for our profession,” says Agnew. “For 40 years our organization has been trying to hit the moving target of what it means to be a technical communicator. Our skills have changed rapidly along with technology and the many ways of communicating it. Finally, this past year the STC settled on our core competencies.”

Certification requires expert evaluation of demonstrated skills in 9 areas that cover user, task and experience analysis, information design, information development, information production, and process management. It includes a commitment to honour a code of conduct and professional ethics.

Long a skilled and qualified professional, Agnew and others awarded the CPTC™ are now recognized on a par with MCSE, PMP, CGA, and other “Registered” or “Certified” experts.

“It’s exciting that our professional organization now can grant official acknowledgement of our skills that employers and clients can rely upon,” she says.

“Our profession is very broad,” says Agnew. “We deal with all aspects of usability, user assistance, product and content development, customer relationships, and information architecture. That’s a tall order. Technical communicators make significant contributions to improving a company’s bottom line by reducing customer support costs and making technology easier to use and understand.”

Technical communicators are industry independent, working as easily in aerospace and engineering as banking, manufacturing and science, though some specialize in their particular areas of interest.

“Practitioner backgrounds are as varied as our workplaces,” notes Agnew. “Ideal for career changers, your existing knowledge and experience are leveraged into communicating about technology to achieve specific results.”

Agnew’s background?

“Fine Arts,” she laughs. “Specifically, Fiction Writing, but that hasn’t hindered me working for NASA, the Geological Survey of Canada or MDS Sciex.”

Professor Agnew is the co-ordinator of the Seneca College one year post-graduate program in Technical Communication and teaches courses in information technology, web-based training and multimedia. The program is focused on giving students a solid foundation in the areas that will be required for certification when they’ve met the experience requirements.

“All you need are an affinity for technology and some writing ability. New grads facing competition for jobs from all their classmates with the same English, Liberal Arts, Computer, or Science degree can take our program in technical communication and quickly differentiate themselves from their competitors. Plus they get co-op work experience that helps launch their new careers.”

Since 1998, the Seneca Tech Comm Program has been graduating skilled technical communicators who have gone on to work for companies such as IBM, RIM, Siemens Milltronics, TD Bank, Mount Sinai Hospital, engineering firms and government ministries.

“Technical Communication is a very rewarding profession,” says Agnew. “When we do our jobs right, it’s completely transparent. We work behind the scenes, and few realize there’s been a technical communicator involved. The only evidence is that products are easier to use, information much easier to understand, and customers are more satisfied with their purchases.”

“Every company can benefit from having a technical communicator on the payroll.”

For more information on the Technical Communication Program, and to apply, see http://www.senecacollege.ca/fulltime/TECC.html. Contact the Society for Technical Communication at http://stc.org.

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Awards from STC Toronto AGM

Seneca College’s Technical Communication Program was acknowledged with a Silver Sponsorship award for providing support to the 2010 Career Day event held by the Toronto community of the STC.

In addition, we were delighted to see one of our grads, Noor Hussain, win the Distinguished Service Award for Students for his outstanding contributions to the Toronto chapter—for inspiration, enthusiasm, creativity, and quiet dedication to the Toronto STC community in organizing networking events and encouraging student participation.

One of our faculty, Bernard Aschwanden, was recognized with the Rennie Charles Award for his leadership and support in the tradition of Rennie Charles, much cherished by the Toronto technical writing community for the “ideas, support, advice and mirth” he shared with them.

Other recognition and Community Service Awards made at the STC Toronto AGM can be found on their site.

Congratulations to all award winners! It is this level of dedication that has made the STC Toronto Community truly one of excellence.

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