STC Toronto Event: A New Approach to Resume Writing to Beat HR Robots Tuesday, April 11, 2017

FREE for current Tech Comm students. RSVP to Vic Bhai.

Shared from STC Toronto:

Pamela Paterson

Pamela Paterson

Do you know how to beat the HR robot and get your resume noticed by a human being? If  you apply for jobs online, you need to know how to beat Applicant Tracking Systems (ATSs) with an online resume and effective personal branding.  In this highly informative seminar with bestselling author Pamela Paterson, you will learn how to get your resume in top shape so that it stands out amongst the crowd.

Many qualified candidates go unnoticed by HR because they have not learned how to get filtered and top-ranked in HR systems. In fact, HR may never know they applied, because their resume is either deleted automatically by the system or ranked so low in the candidate pile it doesn’t appear in an HR search.

It is no longer enough that you have the right qualifications based on an impressive work history. In the online job hunt, to get noticed by HR, you need to understand how ATSs work. In this seminar, you will be shown the top ways in which these systems filter and rank candidates, and what you can do to beat the system.

Join us on the second floor of The Wallace Gastropub (steps away from Davisville Station).
WHEN:  April 11, 2017,  6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

In this seminar, you will learn how to:

  • Deconstruct a job posting for the important elements needed to beat HR robots

  • Separate the critical words from the “fluff” in job postings and company collateral

  • Identify issues with your resume that are barriers to getting top-ranked

  • Position your skills and qualifications to best present your candidacy

  • Incorporate personal branding in your resume to best position your skills

Speaker Bio

Pamela Paterson is author of the bestselling book Get the Job: Optimize Your Resume for the Online Job Search, gained an insider’s edge into how online job systems work when she was part of a team that implemented an applicant tracking system for a national company. She has taught about the art and science of creating effective resumes for over 15 years at workshops, colleges, and conferences.

Pamela is a long-time mentor, resume coach, college instructor, and supporter of people who strive for positive change in their lives. She serves on the Board of Directors for the SIPO Foundation, a charity dedicated to empowering youth personally and professionally. Pamela also leads resume and career workshops for the SIPO Foundation.

Pamela works to help individuals boost their career trajectory and reach their full professional potential.  In live presentations and in her book, she lays out a strategic, step-by-step approach to beating online job systems and building laser-sharp resumes that hits home with online hiring professionals. She claims a 90% success rate in helping her clients find jobs through her unique, scientific approach to resume writing.

“After meeting with Pamela and revising my resume, I immediately posted the new version… and literally within 3 hours I received two calls from recruiters about appropriate opportunities. The next day was spent fielding responses from more than 12 recruiters for more than 15 positions—all of which were relevant to my skill set! Within 2 weeks I had interviews, and within 3 weeks was offered a position that was perfect for me. I received unsolicited comments from both interviewers and recruiters as to the professionalism of my newly revised resume, and how impressive it was. I credit Pamela for her insight into what works, what doesn’t, and what is needed to create a winning and effective resume.”

—Patti Cruickshank, Technical Writer 

FREE for currently-enrolled Tech Comm students (proof of enrollment must be shown). TechComm students should contact STC Toronto president, Vic Bhai, to RSVP.

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Seneca Becomes CPTC Accredited Training Organization

Seneca College has been approved as the first Accredited Training Organization for Certified Professional Technical Communicators (CPTC). We can now offer Foundation level training and the certification exam to students and working professionals.

For more information on Certification, and upcoming training sessions, contact Beth Agnew.

 

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Grads Go Back to School

This report from the Globe and Mail on students who go to college after university graduation highlights the advantages practical training and a co-operative work experience give you when you’re looking for a job.

A graduate certificate, like that awarded after completion of our 1-year Technical Communication program, gives new grads additional qualifications that differentiate them from other recent graduates in their field of interest. The co-op work placement provides that valuable real world experience that employers look for.

If you’re a new graduate, consider one of the graduate certificate programs at Seneca, or specifically our program in Technical Communication.

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Interested in Technical Communication?

If you’re looking for more information about technical communication, or as it is also known technical writing, you can search for related items or rely on an aggregator like Alltop.

Gathering information about the profession will lead you to a number of well-written blogs, the Society for Technical Communication itself, and a list of programs that provide degrees, diplomas or certificates in various aspects of the discipline.

If you think TechComm is right for you, we’d love to consider your application for our 1-year post-graduate certificate program. It includes a co-operative education component so you can try out the field while you are learning. TechComm is ideal for anyone who loves to write, explain, and play with technology. Contact us if you want more information.

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Tech Comm Can Be Full of Surprises!

Here’s a note we just got from one of our excellent tech comm grads, Ellen Fleischer:

Maybe I shouldn’t be surprised that I’m working in my field. After all, that was my goal when I went into tech comm. However, after graduation, I had to face a few harsh realities:

  1. I’d entered Tech Comm with a strong English background, but scant technical experience. Partly because of this and partly because I tend to get nervous at job interviews, I was unable to secure a co-op placement through Seneca. Instead, I spent my winter semester copyediting a textbook. Even though I loved the work and it fulfilled the co-op requirement, the position didn’t give me hands-on workplace experience in tech comm.
  2. Not having much of a technical background, the thought of working with IT terrified me.

After I graduated in August, I updated my resume and tried my best to find work in editing and/or tech comm. I started volunteering for a monthly online magazine, which led to some paid editing credits on an independent comic book (expected publication in March 2013).

I also started exploring the freelance sites. It took about three months, but I’ve just hooked up with one of the rare US-based companies (as opposed to independent employers looking for cheap short-term labor) that does not require a W9 of their independent contractors. They advertised for someone to rewrite their procedures manuals and were very impressed by my portfolio—despite its lack of IT documentation.

I’m doing freelance work for Covalent IT in Colorado. I never saw myself doing anything like this, much less enjoying it, but I do and I am.

Great news, Ellen, thanks for letting us know! Ellen is not the only grad to find that her first few technical communication assignments involved working remotely as a freelance contractor. These initial forays into the profession can lead to other more lucrative and permanent opportunities.

We’re proud of all our grads, and love to hear how you’re doing. Don’t forget to keep in touch!

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New Program Co-ordinator

After four years as co-ordinator of the Technical Communication program, Beth Agnew is handing over this responsibility to Anna Parker-Richards.

“It’s a great opportunity to get someone new involved in the Program,” says Professor Agnew. “Anna has been a strong leader in the Toronto chapter of the STC and her drive will be an asset to Seneca College and to our technical communication students.”

Having grown the program from a low of 18 students when she took over as co-ordinator in 2008 to a recent high of 42 students, Professor Agnew is still going to be active in getting the word out about this top post-graduate educational program for those seeking to enter the profession.

“I’ll still be teaching technical communication subjects and working with Anna and our co-op co-ordinator Charmaine Johnson to find appropriate work placements for our students,” says Agnew. Due to the program’s excellent reputation, there are more applicants than ever — prompting a second intake that will begin in May 2013.

Agnew thinks the program provides great return on investment. “The technical communication program is ideal for career changers because they can leverage their existing skills, background and experience into a new profession. Nothing is wasted. For new university graduates, the Tech Comm program offers a way to add to their skills while the students are still in “study mode”. It helps them differentiate themselves from all the others graduating with similar degrees.”

Tech Comm grads have proven technology and communication skills — high value currency in today’s workplace. “Plus, they’re trained to be problem-solvers,” says Agnew. “Providing solutions to customer problems always improves a company’s bottom line. That makes us very valuable commodities in any company.”

Agnew is excited about the new directions the Tech Comm program will be taking with Anna Parker-Richards as co-ordinator. “Anna is a positive leader,” she says. “She’s a master at networking and has the vision to ensure our program is meeting the needs of employers and students.”

For more information on the Technical Communication program, and to apply, see http://senecacollege.ca/fulltime/TECC.html

 

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